Author Topic: "What is Stalling"  (Read 739 times)

cwilson

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"What is Stalling"
« on: December 11, 2016, 07:39:44 PM »
In the article "What is Stalling" it refers to how to call stalling on wrestler A if he is up 5-2.  I thought stalling was stalling and should be called the same in the first, second, and third period.  One of my big issues with the way stalling is called is that the wrestler that is winning and agressive builds a lead while his opponent is non-aggressive and does not get called for stalling.  And then in the third period when the losing wrestler gets desperate and picks up his offense, all of the sudden the winning wrestler is stalling.  It is suppose to be called the same in the first as in the third.  More often than not, the wrestler that scores more points (aggressive) is the one that is stalling in the closing part of the match.  It is not stalling to block the shots of a desperate wrestler.  Defending and holding ground vs a desperate wrestler is aggressive wrestling.  No problem with calling the winning wrestler in the third if the losing wrestler gets called in the first for the same behavior.  No problem for calling the winning wrestler for running and avoiding contact, but that isn't normally the way it works.  Most stalling calls happen in the last 30 seconds of matches vs the wrestler that has been aggressive, and that is just the way it has been.  Just saying
« Last Edit: December 11, 2016, 07:43:55 PM by cwilson »

rexanderson

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Re: "What is Stalling"
« Reply #1 on: December 12, 2016, 08:49:02 AM »
Great points - I think the first line of that paragraph addresses your concern - 'For example, if wrestler A is winning 5-2, and each wrestler is in Neutral, the official will be looking at A to not block and avoid wrestling.'

As officials, we must be observant of things like you mention - stalling must be called the same in all periods; however often times stalling by that wrestler isn't noticed until the 2nd/3rd period at times. What one wrestler does to stall, another might be defending a shot, etc. But when stalling is recognized, it must be assessed. You're right though, the final 30 seconds of the match, the wrestler who is up is usually the one trying to coast and defend a lead.

89falcon

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Re: "What is Stalling"
« Reply #2 on: December 16, 2016, 07:38:02 PM »
Has there been any philosophical change wrt "funk" wrestlers? In the past I've seen the stall calls after a hard sprawl, and after repeated initiation of a stailmate or potentially dangerous situation by one wrestler, but with the increased number of guys who seem to use "funking around" on the mat to merely stop the other guy from scoring...resulting in a lot of movement with no real action....thoughts?

cwilson

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Re: "What is Stalling"
« Reply #3 on: January 02, 2017, 09:29:29 AM »
I think if we did some stats of when and to who stalling is called we would find that the two most common calls that happen for stalling occur to the wrestler that is winning and closing out a match and the wrestler in the top position.  Interesting that the aggressor is called for stalling the most. 

Of course,  i am not saying that it is impossible to stall with hold down rides on top or literally run from the opponent in the closing seconds of a match.  If you were running in the first you would get called as well.  But in the first period you don't get called for sprawling.  But in the third period you are stalling if you are sprawling, but only if you are winning.  And there lies the problem with how this is not called consistently from first to third.  The score should not matter.  Stalling is stalling and sprawling and defending a shot is not stalling.  Lack of aggression is stalling, but the winning wrestler has been the aggressor, so he should not be penalized for defending a shot once in a match when his opponent did not called for defending early in the match.  Backing up on the other hand is a different issue.  The winning wrestler has earned his right to hold his ground and defend versus a desperate wrestler in the third.  Sprawling is not backing up.  Sprawling is holding your ground. 

Versus quality opponents that don't get turned, it should be possible to ride for an entire period without getting called for stalling.  As long as the top wrestler continually tries to improve he is not stalling. But I wish some referees could recognize that there are some guys that you just won't turn and you have to work your butt off just to stay in control.  If you are constantly trying to improve, you are not stalling in the top position.  Returning a man that has stood up is improving.  Breaking a man down that is on his base is improving.  Working angles is an attempt to improve.  YOu can do all of this and still get stalled out of a match with some offiials vs a quality wrestler.  The bottom guy needs to get called more in my opinion.  I see a lot of top guys get called for a hold down ride on top of a bottom guy that is not working to escape but merely working to stay off of his or her back.

I love a good stalling call, but what I don't appreciate is the official that only makes the call in the closing part of a match vs the wrestler that has dominated the entire match.  From a philosophical point of view, the wrestler that is not active and is not scoring points and is in the defensive position for the majority of the match is the one who is stalling.  Consistently, this is not how it is called.

I really like what they are trying to do with College stalling right now.  They are attempting to take judgement out of the call, or course you can never take all judement out, but you can reduce it.  I love the back out without action and your stalling call - mandatory.  We could put that into high school wrestling next year and it would be awesome.

cwilson

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Re: "What is Stalling"
« Reply #4 on: February 26, 2017, 05:22:18 PM »
I think the referees did a pretty good job calling stalling for backing up and in the closing seconds this year.  I didn't see very many calls late in matches that were controversial.  That was good.  However, we are not doing so good on calling stalling in the first 5:30 seconds of the match for nonaction.  Personally I like nonaction stalling calls, but at the same time, the refs were staying out of the match and letting the kids decided it, so it is what it is and it was fairly consistent, Howver, the flee call is nonexistant despite being a point of emphasis recently, and despite that wrestlers were clearly leaving the wrestling area to avoid scoring throughout the tournament.   We would have great action on the edge if the officiating would make that action happen by calling fleeing consistently.  My observation